U is for Uriah

uA lazy king sleeps with a woman after being captivated by her beauty and kills her husband to cover up his indiscretion after failing to trick her honorable husband into sleeping with her to explain her pregnancy. Sounds like something out of Game of Thrones, right? Wrong. It’s from the Bible.

Uriah was a man in the time of King David who had the unfortunate honor of being married to a beautiful woman the king desired. Her name was Bathsheba and her infidelity with King David and the shenanigans that followed have become a cautionary tale of the corrupting power of authority and the need for accountability for leaders. Uriah was a soldier in King David’s army and he had a lovely wife and while he was off fighting in wars for his king and country, the king slept with his wife and got her pregnant. So the King did the logical thing, he summoned the soldier home for a little shore leave to help cover up his indiscretion. The problem was that Uriah wouldn’t go home.

“Uriah said to David, ‘The ark and Israel and Judah are staying in tents, and my commander Joab and my lord’s men are camped in the open country. How could I go to my house to eat and drink and make love to my wife? As surely as you live, I will not do such a thing!’

Then David said to him, ‘Stay here one more day, and tomorrow I will send you back.’ So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day and the next. At David’s invitation, he ate and drank with him, and David made him drunk. But in the evening Uriah went out to sleep on his mat among his master’s servants; he did not go home.

In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it with Uriah. In it he wrote, ‘Put Uriah out in front where the fighting is fiercest. Then withdraw from him so he will be struck down and die.’

So while Joab had the city under siege, he put Uriah at a place where he knew the strongest defenders were. When the men of the city came out and fought against Joab, some of the men in David’s army fell; moreover, Uriah the Hittite died.

(2 Samuel 11:11-17 NIV)

Uriah was too dang proud and loyal to his comrades-at-arms to take real leisure while at home so David had him killed to cover up his crime. Cool guy that David.

Murder mysteries and corrupt royals have a regular place at the gaming table and many unjust rulers get toppled through roleplaying games. How do you confront evil and corruption within the mighty? How do you try to correct those who have abused their power? Is there still hope for reconciliation or does a particular crime mean that a leader cannot be allowed to rule any longer? How is justice best served and should you be the one to help bring it?

The way this particular story pans out is pretty excellent. A man named Nathan was a prophet who spoke for God. He had come before David before and he arrived in the King’s courts with a story to tell asking for the King’s Justice. He tells the story of a rich man who had everything  and a poor man who only had one little lamb who he had cared for for years. When a guest came for the king, he took the poor man’s lamb and killed it and served it to his guests. Nathan finished his story and asked for the King to declare judgment. David ranted and screamed that this man must be brought forward and punished most harshly. Nathan stops and simply says, “You are that man.” The King realizes what he is done and grieves his sinfulness. He is still punished, but he becomes a much better king because of it.

The way we answer that question of how far can a hero go before they fall beyond recovery can define an entire campaign. David had his foibles, but he is still lauded as an incredible poet and warrior who knew the heart of God. Nathan (and God by extension) saw the potential for good in David and went the route of reconciliation for him. How far are you willing to go in a game to bring someone back and how much will you let stand before justice must rise above? Alignments in rpg’s give direction as to how you approach the answers of these questions, but I’d not seen many responses like Nathan’s. He’s Lawful Creative or something like that.

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2 responses to “U is for Uriah

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